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Comment: Are you an Internet Producer or Consumer?

Most people who use the Net nowadays really fall into one of two categories.

1) Internet Consumers - This is most of us. We may occasionally paste some video into Facebook, but we normally use the Net to swap emails, read the news and occasionally look at pictures of other naked people.
2) Internet Producers - Leaving aside the techies for a moment (the people who "build" the Internet), these are the people who are obsessed with getting their points across, their opinions discussed, their crappy music demo listened to, and posting naked pictures of themselves online for the Consumers to look at (oh yeah, let's not forget those budding young stars trying to get their 3 minutes of YouTube fame).

Ok, so most of us probably fall somewhere in the middle. We blog, we may occasionally post something to YouTube, and maybe we daydream about being naked online before we realize what a bad career move that is...

For about 10 years now I have been making a living as one of these people who "build" the Internet. Were it not for this wonderful piece (pieces) of technology I would still be living in my parents' basement, but lo and behold, I now have a lucrative career. But you know what? There's not one of us "techies" who doesn't dream about either making history or having a blog so popular you only need to work on it 3 hours a day.

For a long time now, I have been pretty much a consumer outside of my professional life. I would post questions on bulletins when I had a technical question and lo and behold, someone would answer it. Tonight I decided to try and give back to the tech community, but every time I saw a question I knew the answer to, someone had beaten me to answering it.

So instead I decided to write this little article to keep you all amused.

It's my way of giving back to the community...

I must remember to post this on Reddit.com so I will get a few page views.

;)

Comments

Ringo Mercedes said…
While I do occasionally post to my blog, I am more of a consumer really...
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