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Where is the computer?

http://www.macobserver.com/article/2008/02/06.8.shtml

Danish Police were apparently confused while trying to confiscate someone's 1G iMac thinking it was only a monitor.
  • 'Where's the computer?' he said.
  • 'On the desk. That's the computer,' I said.
  • 'No, the computer.'
  • 'That's the computer, dude.'
I wonder if "dude" is a literal translation from Danish.

Personally I remember the 1st generation iMacs and the guy was lucky not to get arrested for taste reasons alone (what with those garish candy coated colours...).

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