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Getting back to Flex

So one of my upcoming projects may involve Adobe Flex so I am trying to get my brain Flexy again. It's been almost a year since I coded anything in that language so I am trying to get back into all the usual concepts (code behind, cairngorm, etc...).

Of course the day I decide I am going to start looking at this, Flex Builder 3 is released (along with Adobe AIR, codenamed Apollo) which leaves me with a conundrum. Do I start this project in Flex 2 or 3? I am not really a fan of "brand new" tech as it normally has a lot of bugs that need working out, but those geniuses (geniui?) at Adobe have finally put in some backwards compatibility. Also it doesn't look like the language has changed much (mainly the IDE) which is a great relief (there was a huge jump between Flex 1 and 2).

So with the release of Adobe AIR I can finally call myself a Desktop developer too (as AIR allows you to write desktop apps with web app languages). If only they would switch over to Ruby from ActionScript though (then my life would be complete...).

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